Forest Management Unit Information

Name or Unit #: Douglas-fir Forest Acres: 68

Location: This unit is the DFR4D forest type found in six locations, all but one in the APZ parcel (see “Vegetation Types” map).

 

Objectives:

Use a combination of pre-commercial and commercial thinning and individual tree selection and group selection harvesting to create and maintain a biodiverse, late successional forest that has the similar architectural structure and ecological functions as the primary and late successional forest
Treat forest fuels so that wildfires will be easily-controlled, low-intensity surface fires, in order to protect the residents from harm and to prevent the destruction of houses, outbuildings, the water system, and other infrastructure,

Reduce the risk of fire ignitions by reducing fuels along USFS Road, internal roads, and around inhabited structures,

Create forest conditions that will enable the use of prescribed fire as a management tool,
And create a fire resilient forest by removing fire ladder fuels and thinning over-stocked forest stands in order to restore late successional and primary forest ecological balances.

Description:

Stand history, age and desired rotation cycle:
There are old skid trails in these stands and large (3-5 feet in diameter) Douglas-fir stumps and residual logs scattered throughout. As the Ranch has been in private ownership since at least the early 1900s, it is likely that there have been multiple harvests. No records of such harvests have been found. Based on the condition of stumps and residual logs, it appears that the last harvest was during the 1950s. Most of the Douglas-firs that were bored for age were 80-90 years of age.

As the vision for the forest is to create a late seral forest through selection harvesting, there is no specific rotation cycle for this unit. It is anticipated that the stands will be entered on a cutting cycle of about 15 years to conduct a commercial thin and/or selection harvest.
Tree species present, forest type and/or ecological site description (ESD):

This is a WHR Douglas-fir forest type (DFR4D). Depending upon location, it is dominated by either pole to small sawtimber-size conifers (primarily Douglas-fir, with minor sugar pine and ponderosa pine), with a lesser component of hardwoods (primarily California black oak, Oregon white oak, and Pacific madrone, with some canyon live oak and tanoak). Refer to the section on Forest Infrastructure above and the FVS readout on the CD attached to this plan for a more detailed description of the stand.
Site index, soil type, elevation, slope:

Based on the U.S. Forest Service soil survey (“Soil Survey of Shasta-Trinity Forest Area, California”, USDA-USFS, Soil Conservation Service, and U.C. Agricultural Experiment Station, 1983), this area is underlain by Dunsmuir family of soils, 15-40% slopes, with Dunning’s site classes ranging from I-III (site index at 100 years of age of 80-175). Elevations range from about 2690-2890 feet.
DBH/size class, basal area, trees/acre, stocking, growth/yield potential:

The results of two FVS runs of inventory data, one for the existing stand unmanaged for the next 50 years and one for a thinning from below of primarily suppressed, intermediate, and codominant trees, is included on the CD attached to this plan. These runs have tables showing, by species, DBH/size class, basal area/acre, trees/acre, board feet and cubic feet/acre, stocking, growth/yield potential, and other stand parameters.

Regeneration and stand improvement needs:

The forest is well stocked with trees and no regeneration is required at this time. What would be beneficial from a stand health, growth, and fire resiliency standpoint is to thin the forest, using a pre-commercial/commercial thinning of suppressed, intermediate, and some co-dominant trees. This type of thinning is modeled in the DFTFBx1 FVS run included on the CD attached to this plan.
Riparian, meadows, aquatic habitat, stream and other watercourses:

Erosion is affecting the integrity of some of the watercourses in some areas of this unit; i.e. along some portions of the three Class III tributaries that converge into the main tributary to Buckeye Creek that is just north of USFS Road. Recommendations for addressing these problems are found under “Management Plan Implementation”: “Streams, Wetlands, and Ponds”.
Understory, downed woody debris, snags, wildlife habitat:

Understory trees and shrubs are minimal in this unit due to the generally dense overstory canopy. Downed woody debris in general consists of scattered, small dead trees, broken tops, and limbs, with occasional large cull logs left from the previous harvest. There are scattered, mostly small snags. Wildlife habitat is typical for a second growth conifer forest at this stage of development; i.e. few logs and snags, scattered hardwoods, some old, large, and decadent, generally open forest floor with few shrubs and almost devoid of grass.

Unit Management Resource Concerns and Recommendations:

Erosion concerns:

Based on the U.S. Forest Service soil survey, the Dunsmuir family of soils, 15-40% slopes, have moderate erodibility potential. As most of this unit is on less than 20% slopes and ground cover is moderate to dense, erosion potential is minimal.
Domestic uses:

One unfinished, unoccupied cabin (Pond Cabin) that has piped water to it is in this unit. Agro-forestry can be initiated in this unit to produce fruits, nuts, berries, mushrooms, tubers, and herbs.

Other conservation issues:

Name or Unit #: Montane Hardwood-Conifer Forest Acres: 51

Location: This unit is the MHC3D forest type found in three locations, primarily in the APZ parcel (see “Vegetation Types” map).

IMG_9266

Objectives:

Use a combination of pre-commercial and commercial thinning and individual tree selection and group selection harvesting to create and maintain a biodiverse, late successional forest that has the similar architectural structure and ecological functions as the primary and late successional forest
Treat forest fuels so that wildfires will be easily-controlled, low-intensity surface fires, in order to protect the residents from harm and to prevent the destruction of houses, outbuildings, the water system, and other infrastructure,

Reduce the risk of fire ignitions by reducing fuels along USFS Road 4N09, internal roads, and around inhabited structures,

Create forest conditions that will enable the use of prescribed fire as a management tool,

And create a fire resilient forest by removing fire ladder fuels and thinning over-stocked forest stands in order to restore late successional and primary forest ecological balances.

Description:

Stand history, age and desired rotation cycle:
There are old skid trails in these stands and large (3½-5½ feet in diameter) Douglas-fir stumps and residual logs scattered throughout. As the Ranch has been in private ownership since at least the early 1900s, it is likely that there have been multiple harvests. No records of such harvests have been found. Based on the condition of stumps and residual logs, it appears that the last harvest was during the 1950s. The overstory Douglas-firs that were bored for age ranged from 79-122 years of age while the understory trees ranged from 32-56 years (mostly around 45 years).

As the vision for the forest on the Ranch is to create a late seral forest through selection harvesting, there is no specific rotation cycle for this unit. It is anticipated that the stands will be entered on a cutting cycle of about 15 years to conduct a commercial thin and/or selection harvest.

Tree species present, forest type and/or ecological site description (ESD):
This is a WHR Montane Hardwood-Conifer type (MHC3D). Depending upon location, it is dominated by either pole to small sawtimber-size hardwoods (primarily California black oak, Pacific madrone, and Oregon white oak, with some canyon live oak and tanoak) or conifers (primarily Douglas-fir, with minor ponderosa pine and sugar pine). Refer to the section on Forest Infrastructure above and the FVS readout on the CD attached to this plan for a more detailed description of the stand.
Site index, soil type, elevation, slope:

Based on the U.S. Forest Service soil survey (“Soil Survey of Shasta-Trinity Forest Area, California”, USDA-USFS, Soil Conservation Service, and U.C. Agricultural Experiment Station, 1983), this area is primarily underlain by Dunsmuir family of soils, 15-40% slopes, with Dunning’s site classes ranging from I-III (site index at 100 years of age of 80-175). Elevations range from about 2690-3160 feet.
DBH/size class, basal area, trees/acre, stocking, growth/yield potential:

The results of two FVS runs of inventory data, one for the existing stand unmanaged for the next 50 years and one for a thinning from below of primarily suppressed, intermediate, and codominant trees, is included on the CD attached to this plan. These runs have tables showing, by species, DBH/size class, basal area/acre, trees/acre, board feet and cubic feet/acre, stocking, growth/yield potential, and other stand parameters.

Regeneration and stand improvement needs:

The forest is well stocked with both overstory trees and saplings and poles, so no regeneration is required at this time. What would be beneficial from a stand health, growth, and fire resiliency standpoint is to thin the forest, using a pre-commercial/commercial thinning of suppressed, intermediate, and some co-dominant trees. This type of thinning is modeled in the MHCTFBx1 FVS run included on the CD attached to this plan.
Riparian, meadows, aquatic habitat, stream and other watercourses:

The only erosion problem of note in this unit is in a Class III watercourse above and below a shotgun culvert under USFS Road.

Understory, downed woody debris, snags, wildlife habitat:

Understory tree stocking is variable in this unit, dense in some areas and sparse in others. Downed woody debris in general consists of scattered, small dead trees, broken tops, and limbs, with occasional large cull logs left from the previous harvest. There are scattered, mostly small snags. Wildlife habitat is typical for a second growth hardwood-conifer forest at this stage of development; i.e. few logs and snags, hardwoods mixed with conifers in various groupings and densities, some old, large, and decadent hardwoods, and shrubs and grass primarily under gaps in the overstory.

Unit Management Resource Concerns and Recommendations:
Erosion concerns:

Based on the U.S. Forest Service soil survey, the Dunsmuir family of soils, 15-40% slopes, have moderate erodibility potential. Most of this unit is on 30-50% slopes, but tree cover is moderate to dense and there is generally a moderate to dense litter layer, so erosion is currently minimal.

Sediment is being transported to Buckhorn Creek by the Class II watercourse running through the most southern portion of the APZ parcel. Sediment is being introduced into this channel through a number of Class III watercourses by bank and channel erosion, erosion from the power line right-of-way, and erosion from roads, including USFS Road and the dirt road that enters the most southern portion of the APZ parcel from the east, just south. The latter road may also be contributing sediment where it runs along the watercourse and at the old, washed out crossing. Recommendations for addressing these problems are found under “Management Plan Implementation”: “Roads” and “Streams, Wetlands, and Ponds”.
Domestic uses:

There are three finished cabins that have piped water to them and one cabin under construction in this unit. Agro-forestry can be initiated in this unit to produce fruits, nuts, berries, mushrooms, tubers, and herbs.
Other conservation issues:

Name or Unit #: Montane Hardwood Forest Acres: 13

Location: This unit is the MHW4D forest type found in one location, in the APZ parcel (see “Vegetation Types” map).
Objectives:

Use a combination of pre-commercial and commercial thinning and individual tree selection and group selection harvesting to create and maintain a biodiverse, late successional forest that has the similar architectural structure and ecological functions as the primary and late successional forest
Treat forest fuels so that wildfires will be easily-controlled, low-intensity surface fires, in order to protect the residents from harm and to prevent the destruction of houses, outbuildings, the water system, and other infrastructure,

Create forest conditions that will enable the use of prescribed fire as a management tool,

And create a fire resilient forest by removing fire ladder fuels and thinning over-stocked forest stands in order to restore late successional and primary forest ecological balances.

Description:

Stand history, age and desired rotation cycle:
Use a combination of pre-commercial and commercial thinning and individual tree selection and group selection harvesting to create and maintain a biodiverse, late successional forest that has the similar architectural structure and ecological functions as the primary and late successional forest
Treat forest fuels so that wildfires will be easily-controlled, low-intensity surface fires, in order to protect the residents from harm and to prevent the destruction of houses, outbuildings, the water system, and other infrastructure,
Reduce the risk of fire ignitions by reducing fuels along internal roads and around inhabited structures,
Create forest conditions that will enable the use of prescribed fire as a management tool,
And create a fire resilient forest by removing fire ladder fuels and thinning over-stocked forest stands in order to restore late successional and primary forest ecological balances.
Tree species present, forest type and/or ecological site description (ESD):

This is a WHR Montane Hardwood type (MHW4D). Depending upon location, it is dominated by either pole to large sawtimber-size hardwoods (primarily canyon live oak and Pacific madrone, with some California black oak and tanoak), with a lesser component of pole to small sawtimber-size conifers (primarily Douglas-fir, with minor sugar pine and incense cedar). Refer to the section on Forest Infrastructure above and the FVS readout on the CD attached to this plan for a more detailed description of the stand.
Site index, soil type, elevation, slope:

Based on the U.S. Forest Service soil survey (“Soil Survey of Shasta-Trinity Forest Area, California”, USDA-USFS, Soil Conservation Service, and U.C. Agricultural Experiment Station, 1983), this area is primarily underlain by Dunsmuir family of soils, 15-40% slopes, with Dunning’s site classes ranging from I-III (site index at 100 years of age of 80-175). Elevations range from about 2560-2760 feet.
DBH/size class, basal area, trees/acre, stocking, growth/yield potential:

The results of two FVS runs of inventory data, one for the existing stand unmanaged for the next 50 years and one for a thinning from below of primarily suppressed, intermediate, and codominant trees, is included on the CD attached to this plan. These runs have tables showing, by species, DBH/size class, basal area/acre, trees/acre, board feet and cubic feet/acre, stocking, growth/yield potential, and other stand parameters.

Regeneration and stand improvement needs:

The forest is well stocked with both overstory trees and saplings and poles in some areas and moderately to sparsely stocked in others. Regeneration of slides below the access road, around the landing at the end of the road, and in other sparsely stocked areas would be beneficial. What would be most beneficial from a stand health, growth, and fire resiliency standpoint is to thin the forest, using a pre-commercial/commercial thinning of suppressed, intermediate, and some co-dominant trees. This type of thinning is modeled in the MHWTFBx1 FVS run included on the CD attached to this plan.
Riparian, meadows, aquatic habitat, stream and other watercourses:

Buckeye Creek, a Class II watercourse, runs through the northwest corner of this unit. The condition of the channel, which has log jams, sediment plugs, and cascades, does not appear to support a fishery on the Ranch even when there is water flowing. The presence of a fishery downstream from the Ranch is unknown.

A Class III tributary to Buckeye Creek originates at the wet meadow (WTM1D) and runs through this unit. With development of a pond in the wet meadow, this watercourse might become a perennial stream. However, it will never support a fishery due to a few high falls, one just above its confluence with Buckeye Creek.

Understory, downed woody debris, snags, wildlife habitat:

Understory tree stocking is variable in this unit but is generally moderately dense. Downed woody debris in general consists of scattered, small dead trees, broken tops, and limbs, with occasional large cull logs left from the previous harvest. There are scattered, mostly small snags. Wildlife habitat is typical for a second growth hardwood forest at this stage of development; i.e. few logs and snags, primarily hardwoods mixed with some conifers in various groupings and densities, some old, large, and decadent hardwoods, and shrubs and grass primarily under gaps in the overstory.
Unit Management Resource Concerns and Recommendations:

Erosion concerns:

Based on the U.S. Forest Service soil survey, the Dunsmuir family of soils, 15-40% slopes, have moderate erodibility potential. However, there is severe slope instability below the road in the northwest portion of the MHW4D type. Land sliding appears to be the result of past timber harvesting on steep slopes. Portions of these slides have re-vegetated but other areas are still actively eroding. It appears that most of the sediment is being captured before it enters Buckeye Creek, but some is still entering the creek. These slides need to be stabilized.
Domestic uses:

There is one unfinished, unoccupied cabin (“View Cabin”) in this unit that has piped water to it. Agro-forestry can be initiated in this unit to produce fruits, nuts, berries, mushrooms, tubers, and herbs.
Other conservation issues:

Name or Unit #: Cut Montane Hardwood Forest Acres: 7

Location: This unit is the MHW3D forest type found in one location, in the TPZ parcel (see “Vegetation Types” map).

Objectives:

Allow this area to regenerate naturally to serve as wildlife habitat.

Description:

Stand history, age and desired rotation cycle:
This unit was logged in 2002 by cable to remove most of the overstory conifers. It is now primarily stocked with canyon live oak, with a minor component of conifers, primarily residual, formerly suppressed Douglas-fir. The two 5-inch DBH Douglas-firs that were bored for age were 60 and 87 years old. As this unit is dominated by canyon live oak and is on a westerly aspect on low site soils, no active management is anticipated and no rotation cycle is set.

Tree species present, forest type and/or ecological site description (ESD):
This is a WHR Montane Hardwood type (MHW3D). Depending upon location, it is dominated by either pole to large sawtimber-size hardwoods (primarily canyon live oak, with a lesser component of Pacific madrone and California black oak, and some Oregon white oak and tanoak), with a lesser component of sapling and pole-size conifers (primarily Douglas-fir). Refer to the section on Forest Infrastructure above and the FVS readout on the CD attached to this plan for a more detailed description of the stand.
Site index, soil type, elevation, slope:

Based on the U.S. Forest Service soil survey (“Soil Survey of Shasta-Trinity Forest Area, California”, USDA-USFS, Soil Conservation Service, and U.C. Agricultural Experiment Station, 1983), this area is underlain by Deadwood Neuns family of soils, 40-60% slopes, with Dunning’s site classes ranging from IV-VI (site index at 100 years of age of 52-67). Elevations range from 2950-3080 feet.

DBH/size class, basal area, trees/acre, stocking, growth/yield potential:
The results of a FVS run of inventory data for the existing stand, unmanaged for the next 50 years, is included on the CD attached to this plan. This run has tables showing, by species, DBH/size class, basal area/acre, trees/acre, board feet and cubic feet/acre, stocking, growth/yield potential, and other stand parameters.

Regeneration and stand improvement needs:

Portions of this unit were planted with ponderosa pines following the logging in 2002, but seedling survival appears to be minimal. Natural regeneration of primarily Douglas-fir is occurring in some spots. Due to the low site quality, western aspect, and density of existing tree cover, further planting of this unit is not warranted.

The primary tree species in this unit is canyon live oak, which is not considered a commercial species. As this unit is dominated by canyon live oak and is on a westerly aspect on low site soils, no active management is anticipated.

Riparian, meadows, aquatic habitat, stream and other watercourses:

None of these features exist in this unit.

Understory, downed woody debris, snags, wildlife habitat:

There are places in this unit that have tangles of fallen saplings and pole-size trees, broken tops, and/or cull logs left from the 2002 logging. Snags are generally of small diameter and scattered. Large, residual canyon live oaks and Pacific madrones provide acorns and berries for a variety of wildlife.
Unit Management Resource Concerns and Recommendations:
Erosion concerns:

Based on the U.S. Forest Service soil survey, the Deadwood Neuns family of soils, 40-60% slopes, have low erodibility potential, primarily due to high rock content (35-55% gravel in the surface layer). Although most of this unit is on >40% slopes, existing erosion appears to be minimal.
Domestic uses:

There is no current or anticipated domestic use of this unit.
Other conservation issues:

Name or Unit #: Large Residual Oaks Acres: 19

Location: This unit is the WO4P forest type (see “Vegetation Types” map).

Objectives:

Regenerate open areas with a combination of nut trees, native hardwoods, incense and Port Orford cedar, and berries, especially gooseberries.

Description:

Stand history, age and desired rotation cycle:
This unit was logged in 2002 by tractor to remove most of the overstory conifers. No trees were bored for age, but it is estimated that the residual hardwoods are at least 100 years old and may be well over 200 years of age. Active timber management is not anticipated at this time so no rotation cycle has been set.

Tree species present, forest type and/or ecological site description (ESD):
This is a WHR Oregon white oak forest type (WO4P). It is dominated by large Oregon white oaks, with a component of large California black oaks and Pacific madrones. There are pockets of and scattered Douglas-firs, with occasional ponderosa and sugar pines.
Site index, soil type, elevation, slope:

Based on the U.S. Forest Service soil survey (“Soil Survey of Shasta-Trinity Forest Area, California”, USDA-USFS, Soil Conservation Service, and U.C. Agricultural Experiment Station, 1983), this area is primarily underlain by Dunsmuir family of soils, 15-40% slopes, with Dunning’s site classes ranging from I-III (site index at 100 years of age of 80-175). Elevations range from 2790-2950 feet.

DBH/size class, basal area, trees/acre, stocking, growth/yield potential:
This unit was not inventoried, as the low stocking of commercial conifers renders it unsuitable for timber management at this time.

Regeneration and stand improvement needs:

Following the logging in 2002, this unit was planted with ponderosa pines, which have survived and are growing well in spots. Planted pines have been supplemented in some spots with natural regeneration of Douglas-fir. Overall, conifer regeneration is sparse. Ground cover is primarily grass and shrubs (primarily greenleaf manzanita, deerbrush, blackcap, and gooseberry), which is dense in some areas.

Conifer stocking could be improved by removing shrubs, scalping grass, and planting a combination of Douglas-fir and ponderosa pine. However, the property owners have expressed an interest in replanting some areas with nut trees, hardwoods, incense and Port Orford cedars, and berries, especially gooseberries, for domestic and wildlife use. This would also require removing some shrubs and scalping grass to reduce competition for moisture and nutrients.

Riparian, meadows, aquatic habitat, stream and other watercourses:

There are no defined perennial watercourses, riparian areas, or aquatic habitat in this unit.
Understory, downed woody debris, snags, wildlife habitat:

The understory (ground cover) is primarily grass and shrubs (primarily greenleaf manzanita, deerbrush, blackcap, and gooseberry), which is dense in some areas, with scattered conifer regeneration. Downed woody debris and snags are sparse. The shrubs are providing browse for deer and will eventually provide berries for bear, foxes, coyotes, and other species.

Unit Management Resource Concerns and Recommendations:

Erosion concerns:

Based on the U.S. Forest Service soil survey, the Dunsmuir family of soils, 15-40% slopes, have moderate erodibility potential. As most of this unit is on <30% slopes and ground cover is moderate to dense, current erosion and erosion potential are minimal.
Domestic uses:

Agro-forestry can be established in this vegetation type to produce fruits, nuts, berries, mushrooms, tubers, and herbs

Other conservation issues:

Name or Unit #: Oak Woodland Acres: 25

Location: This unit is the WO3P forest type found in six locations in the APZ parcel (see “Vegetation Types” map).

Objectives:

Thin clumps of oak saplings to enhance growth rates.
Eradicate yellow starthistle by pulling or cutting before it goes to seed.

Description:

Stand history, age and desired rotation cycle:
The history of these stands is unknown. They appear to be uneven-aged, with trees ranging in size from seedlings to large sawtimber. No active timber management is anticipated in this unit so no rotation cycle is set.

Tree species present, forest type and/or ecological site description (ESD):

This is a WHR Oregon white oak forest type (WO3P). Depending upon location, it is dominated by either pole or small sawtimber-size hardwoods (primarily Oregon white oak, with a lesser component of California black oak and a few canyon live oak), with a few scattered pole to medium sawtimber-size conifers (primarily Douglas-fir, with minor ponderosa pine). Trees tend to be in clumps or scattered throughout grassland. The furthest south stand is largely composed of relatively dense, small diameter white oaks. Refer to the section on Forest Infrastructure above and the FVS readout on the CD attached to this plan for a more detailed description of the stand.
Site index, soil type, elevation, slope:

Based on the U.S. Forest Service soil survey (“Soil Survey of Shasta-Trinity Forest Area, California”, USDA-USFS, Soil Conservation Service, and U.C. Agricultural Experiment Station, 1983), this area is underlain by Dunsmuir family of soils, 15-40% slopes, with Dunning’s site classes ranging from I-III (site index at 100 years of age of 80-175). Elevations range from 2660-2850 feet.
DBH/size class, basal area, trees/acre, stocking, growth/yield potential:

This unit was inventoried, although the low stocking of commercial conifers and the scattered oaks renders it unsuitable for management for commercial timber purposes. The results of a FVS run of inventory data for the existing stand, unmanaged for the next 50 years, is included on the CD attached to this plan. This run has tables showing, by species, DBH/size class, basal area/acre, trees/acre, board feet and cubic feet/acre, stocking, growth/yield potential, and other stand parameters. Since the stands in different areas are quite variable in the size and density of trees, FVS runs of the plots in those stands will give a more realistic picture of the actual stand parameters.

Regeneration and stand improvement needs:

Overall, hardwood regeneration is sparse and tends to be clumpy. Ground cover is primarily grass, with minor shrub cover in some areas (primarily greenleaf manzanita and deerbrush). Conifer stocking is largely absent.

Since no active management is anticipated in this unit, natural regeneration of the oaks is adequate. The only stand improvement activity anticipated is to thin clumps of oaks to accelerate growth of selected saplings. Where small tree cover is dense, as in portions of the most southern stand, thinning will accelerate growth to produce larger trees in a shorter period of time.
Riparian, meadows, aquatic habitat, stream and other watercourses:

This unit is largely outside of any but minor watercourses. The exception is the small stand on both sides of the Class II watercourse in the most southern 40 acres of the APZ parcel. Watercourse protection will need to be the main objective for any treatments in this stand.
Understory, downed woody debris, snags, wildlife habitat:

The understory (ground cover) is primarily grass, with minimal shrubs (primarily greenleaf manzanita and deerbrush). Downed woody debris and snags are sparse. The oaks are an important food source for a variety of wildlife and birds and provide nesting, roosting, and cover habitat. The grass cover is valuable too, especially for birds, voles, gophers, ground squirrels, bears, foxes, deer, and other species.
Unit Management Resource Concerns and Recommendations:
Erosion concerns:

Based on the U.S. Forest Service soil survey, the Dunsmuir family of soils, 15-40% slopes, have moderate erodibility potential. As most of this unit is on <20% slopes and ground cover is moderate to dense, current erosion and erosion potential are minimal.
Domestic uses:

There is one cabin in this unit that is used as an art studio (Bear Creek Studio) that has piped water to it. Agro-forestry can be initiated in this unit to produce fruits, nuts, berries, tubers, and herbs.
Other conservation issues:

Name or Unit #: Wet Meadow Acres: 3

Location: This unit is the WTM1D type divided by the boundary between the TPZ and APZ parcels in the northwest portion of the property (see “Vegetation Types” map).

Objectives:

Construct a pond to create wetland habitat and an all-year source of water to supply the seasonal creek.
Description:

Stand history, age and desired rotation cycle:
This is a wet meadow that has no trees in it. No surface evidence was seen that it ever supported trees. It appears that at one time it was a permanent pond. Erosion from the slopes to the east, infill by herbaceous vegetation, and perhaps climate change have caused it to evolve to its current condition.
Tree species present, forest type and/or ecological site description ESD):

This is a wet meadow with sedges and rushes in the wetter areas and grasses and forbs in the drier sections. Refer to the section on Forest Infrastructure above for a more detailed description of the unit.
Site index, soil type, elevation, slope:

Based on the U.S. Forest Service soil survey (“Soil Survey of Shasta-Trinity Forest Area, California”, USDA-USFS, Soil Conservation Service, and U.C. Agricultural Experiment Station, 1983), this area is underlain by Dunsmuir family of soils, 15-40% slopes, with Dunning’s site classes ranging from I-III (site index at 100 years of age of 80-175). The elevation of this unit is 2790 feet.
DBH/size class, basal area, trees/acre, stocking, growth/yield potential:

This is a wet meadow, with no trees growing on it.

Regeneration and stand improvement needs:

This is a wet meadow, with no trees growing on it.

Riparian, meadows, aquatic habitat, stream and other watercourses:

Most of the wet meadow appears to have once been a permanent pond, as seasonally a portion of it is covered with water. The landowners intend to create a permanent pond, with an all-year outflow into what is currently a seasonal creek. This will improve the wetland for ducks, geese, turtles, amphibians, snakes, and other species that will visit it for water and food.

Understory, downed woody debris, snags, wildlife habitat:

There is no visible woody debris in the wet meadow, except for scattered tree tops that have fallen into it. There is a well-used bear trail along the margins of the wet meadow and evidence of use by deer, foxes, and other wildlife.
Unit Management Resource Concerns and Recommendations:
Erosion concerns:
Based on the U.S. Forest Service soil survey, the Dunsmuir family of soils, 15-40% slopes, have moderate erodibility potential. As this unit is on flat slopes, erosion is not a factor.
Domestic uses:

Currently there is no domestic use of this meadow, but after the pond is created, seasonal waterfowl hunting may occur.
Other conservation issues:

Name or Unit #: Riparian Acres: 1

Location: This unit is the Montane Riparian (MRI4D) type found along Buckhorn Creek in the APZ parcel (see “Vegetation Types” map). Although the mapped area is finite, riparian habitat along Buckhorn Creek extends north into the NC type and is also found in the Class II tributary to it. It is also found along Buckeye Creek and its Class II tributary.

Objectives:

Maintain riparian vegetation to shade Buckhorn Creek so as to help minimize temperature increases during the summer months and to act as a filter strip to minimize introduction of sediment during the wet season.
Inoculate selected trees with mushroom spores to produce edible mushrooms for domestic consumption and/or sale.

Description:

Stand history, age and desired rotation cycle:
This unit was not inventoried. It is unlikely that past management has occurred in it. No timber management is anticipated so no rotation cycle is set.
Tree species present, forest type and/or ecological site description (ESD):

The primary tree species in this type are white alder, Oregon bigleaf maple, and Douglas-fir.
Site index, soil type, elevation, slope:

Based on the U.S. Forest Service soil survey (“Soil Survey of Shasta-Trinity Forest Area, California”, USDA-USFS, Soil Conservation Service, and U.C. Agricultural Experiment Station, 1983), this area is underlain by Dunsmuir family of soils, 15-40% slopes, with Dunning’s site classes ranging from I-III (site index at 100 years of age of 80-175). The elevation is about 2720 feet.
DBH/size class, basal area, trees/acre, stocking, growth/yield potential:

As this is a riparian zone, trees were not inventoried.

Regeneration and stand improvement needs:

There are no apparent regeneration or stand improvement needs. It is known that the indigenous people who occupied this area sometimes set fires in riparian areas to clear and renew the vegetation and that they foraged for a variety of foods in them. However, with the current bureaucratic proscriptions on management activities in riparian areas, it is not anticipated that any significant management will be done to improve this unit.

Riparian, meadows, aquatic habitat, stream and other watercourses:

This unit is all riparian vegetation along Buckhorn Creek, a Class I watercourse.

Understory, downed woody debris, snags, wildlife habitat:

The understory includes a variety of shrubs, berries, and forbs. This is valuable habitat for a variety of aquatic species and amphibians, as well as species that visit it to forage for food and drink water.
Unit Management Resource Concerns and Recommendations:
Erosion concerns:

Based on the U.S. Forest Service soil survey, the Dunsmuir family of soils, 15-40% slopes, have moderate erodibility potential. However, due to the level of human activity surrounding this unit, which includes roads, a house and shop, equipment sheds, storage area, orchard, and garden, sediment transport to Buckhorn Creek is of concern. It is critical that a buffer of overstory vegetation be maintained to shade the creek and provide leaves to cover the ground and that ground cover be maintained to act as a filter strip to trap sediment before it can get to the creek. Recommended buffer widths can be found in “Management Plan Implementation”, “Streams, Wetlands, and Ponds”.
Domestic uses:

Currently the only domestic use in this unit is gathering of berries and a couple of alder snags that were inoculated with edible mushroom spores. However, there is a water intake upstream in the NC type (see “Vegetation Type” map) for the ram pump that supplies domestic water.
Other conservation issues:

Name or Unit # Buckhorn Creek Acres 129

Location: This unit includes all the non-commercial (NC) forest type (see “Vegetation Types” map) in the Buckhorn Creek drainage.

Objectives:

As there is no road access to this unit, slopes are steep with many rock outcrops and talus slopes, and conifer stocking is minimal, scattered, and of small diameter following the 2002 logging, no timber management activities are planned at this time.
In the future, this unit will be further evaluated to determine whether it has enough conifer stocking to warrant active management.
This unit is designated for wildlife habitat and watershed protection.

Description:

Stand history, age and desired rotation cycle:
Portions of this unit were logged in 2002 by cable/helicopter to remove a portion of the overstory conifers, primarily near Buckhorn Creek. It is now primarily stocked with canyon live oak, with a minor component of conifers, primarily Douglas-fir. In the logged area, one 6-foot diameter DF stump was aged at 435 years and a 3-foot diameter stump was aged at 270 years. As this unit is not considered to be commercial at this time, no rotation cycle is set.

resent, forest type and/or ecological site description (ESD):

This is a WHR Montane Hardwood forest type (MHW3D). It is dominated by pole to medium sawtimber-size canyon live oaks, with pockets and scattered pole to medium sawtimber-size Douglas-firs and occasional ponderosa and sugar pines and Pacific madrones. Refer to the section on Forest Infrastructure above for a more detailed description of the stand
Site index, soil type, elevation, slope:

Based on the U.S. Forest Service soil survey (“Soil Survey of Shasta-Trinity Forest Area, California”, USDA-USFS, Soil Conservation Service, and U.C. Agricultural Experiment Station, 1983), this area is primarily underlain by Deadwood Neuns family of soils, 40-60% slopes, with Dunning’s site classes ranging from IV-VI (site index at 100 years of age of 52-67). Elevations range from 2720-3670 feet.
DBH/size class, basal area, trees/acre, stocking, growth/yield potential:

This unit was not inventoried, as the lack of road access, recent harvest of a significant portion of the commercial-size conifers, low stocking of commercial conifers, difficulty of regenerating conifers by planting, and low site quality renders it unsuitable for management at this time.
Regeneration and stand improvement needs:

Natural regeneration of primarily Douglas-fir is occurring in some spots, but there are many rock outcrops and talus slopes where both natural and artificial regeneration is precluded.

The primary tree species in this unit is canyon live oak, which is not considered a commercial species. While there are pockets of commercial conifers and Pacific madrones that could be thinned to produce sawlogs and fuelwood, the lack of access renders this infeasible.
Riparian, meadows, aquatic habitat, stream and other watercourses:

Buckhorn Creek, which runs through this unit, is a fish-bearing, Class I watercourse, at least up to the small (5 foot) waterfall north of the tributary in the northern portion of the unit. The aquatic habitat appears to be adequate, with many small pools and gravel bars, in-stream woody debris, and adequate shading by trees.

Understory, downed woody debris, snags, wildlife habitat:

There are places in this unit that have tangles of fallen saplings and pole-size trees, broken tops, and/or cull logs left from the 2002 logging. Snags are generally of small diameter and scattered, although in spots there are large Douglas-fir snags. Large canyon live oaks and Pacific madrones and patches of manzanita in some areas provide acorns and berries for a variety of wildlife.

Unit Management Resource Concerns and Recommendations:

Erosion concerns:

Based on the U.S. Forest Service soil survey, the Deadwood Neuns family of soils, 40-60% slopes, have low erodibility potential, primarily due to high rock content (35-55% gravel in the surface layer). The only observed erosion of note was minor cutbank failures on some of the skid trails below the ridge in the southwest portion of this unit.
Domestic uses:

There is a water intake upstream from the bridge for the ram pump that supplies domestic water.
Other conservation issues:

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